Scientific Advisory Panel

CUREUsher is delighted to introduce you to our Scientific Advisory Panel (SAP). Consisting of professional scientists and clinicians from around the world, they will provide expert and constructive guidance to the board of trustees as we allocate funds to scientific research on Usher syndrome. This panel will grow as time goes on, but as you can see, we are off to a great start with a passionate and enthusiastic team. –Carol Brill, Director for Scientific Research

 

Dr. Isabelle Audo

Dr. Isabelle Audo

Isabelle Audo, M.D., PH.D., is a clinician scientist, professor in ophthalmology, working both at the Quinze-Vingts Hospital and as a group leader in the Department of Genetics at the Vision Institute (Institut de la Vision) in Paris, France. Her areas of expertise are medical retina, inherited retinal disease both for clinical and molecular diagnosis, and visual function explorations with clinical electrophysiology and imaging techniques. Dr. Audo went to medical school at Paris XI University where she received her M.S. degree in Immunology. She completed a residency program in Lille (North of France) from 1994 to 1997, where she became particularly interested in surgical and medical retina, especially in retinal dystrophies and clinical visual electrophysiology. Following her residency, she earned a Master degree in Cellular and Molecular Biology at Louis Pasteur University in Strasbourg, France with Pr. Sahel, and then in 1998, earned her M.D. Dr. Audo completed a research fellowship from 1999 to 2003 at the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Madison, Wisconsin, with Pr. Albert, and earned her Ph.D. From 2003 to 2005, she completed a medical retina fellowship under with Prof. Bird and Holder at the Moorfields Eye, Hospital in London. She went back to Paris, France in 2005 where she completed another Master degree in genetics.

Dr. Audo’s research on inherited retinal diseases has been published in several science papers. She is the coordinator of several laboratory and clinical research project including one of the work package of the ambitious project ‘Light4deaf’ aiming at a better understanding of Usher syndrome.

 

Prof Joseph Carroll

Prof Joseph Carroll

Joseph Carroll, PhD is the Richard O. Schultz, MD / Ruth Works Professor of Ophthalmology, and Professor of Biophysics, Biomedical Engineering, and Cell Biology, Neurobiology & Anatomy at the Medical College of Wisconsin. Dr. Carroll directs the Advanced Ocular Imaging Program (AOIP), which utilizes a variety of retinal imaging tools to study the structure and function of the living human retina. The group has worked to develop image analysis approaches to increase the scientific and clinical utility of these imaging devices and has pioneered the dissemination of this technology to research groups around the world. Dr. Carroll and his team have been at the forefront of the clinical application of adaptive optics retinal imaging, with over 140 peer-reviewed publications. His work focuses broadly on inherited retinal degenerations, including albinism, achromatopsia, retinitis pigmentosa, and Usher syndrome.

Dr. Carroll serves on the editorial boards of Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science, Visual Neuroscience, Translational Vision Science and Technology, and Current Eye Research. Dr. Carroll has received numerous awards, including Vision Research Awards from the E. Matilda Ziegler Foundation (2007) and the Karl Kirchgessner Foundation (2007), a Research to Prevent Blindness Career Development Award (2008), a Young Investigator Award from the ALCON Research Institute (2012), ARVO Gold Fellow (2015), and the ARVO Foundation/Pfizer Ophthalmics Carl Camras Translational Research Award (2018). His research is funded by multiple grants from the National Institutes of Health, as well as a number of public and private foundations.

 

Prof Michel Michaelides

Prof Michel Michaelides

Michel Michaelides is a Consultant Ophthalmologist at Moorfields Eye Hospital in the departments of Medical Retina, Inherited Eye Disease and Paediatric Ophthalmology; and is a Professor of Ophthalmology at the UCL Institute of Ophthalmology. He is a recipient of a Career Development Award from the Foundation Fighting Blindness (USA) – an award rarely given to non-US applicants; and has gained membership of the highly prestigious Macula Society and Retina Society in the USA.

His clinical and research interests include diabetic eye disease and inherited eye disease in adults and children; with over 300 peer-reviewed publications and 30 co-authored book chapters. He is actively involved in retinal clinical trials investigating novel and established therapies, being a principal investigator in 7 on-going clinical trials.

 

Dr. Mark Pennesi

Dr. Mark Pennesi

Dr. Mark Pennesi holds the Kenneth C. Swan Professorship and is an Associate Professor in Ophthalmology at Oregon Health & Science University.  He is the chief of the Ophthalmic Genetics Division at the Casey Eye Institute.  Dr. Pennesi attended the University of Pennsylvania where he graduated summa cum laude with a bachelor’s degree in biomedical engineering.  Dr. Pennesi’s interest in degenerative retinal disorders began shortly after his first year in college, when he spent a summer working at the Retina Foundation of the Southwest. There he worked under the supervision of Dr. David Birch and saw patients with retinal degenerations such as retinitis pigmentosa as well as studying animal models of this disease.

Dr. Pennesi pursued combined at MD/PhD at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas. This was followed by a residency in Ophthalmology at University of California – San Francisco.

Dr. Pennesi is a clinician scientist with a passion for developing novel therapeutic regimens for inherited retinal diseases. He has helped propel the Casey Eye Institute into a leader in novel therapies for inherited retinal dystrophies. He is the PI or Co-PI on 19 clinical trials including: therapies for Leber Congenital Amaurosis, Stargardt Disease, Type IB Usher Syndrome, CNGA3 and CNGB3 Achromatopsia, X-linked retinoschisis, X-linked retinitis pigmentosa, and choroideremia. He serves on the executive committee for the Foundation Fighting Blindness’ Clinic Research Consortium and is study chair for the PRO-Eys study.